Sea Kayaking Articles from P&H Staff, Team Paddlers, and Friends

Category: Technical Page 1 of 2

Lessons Learned- Blade Awareness

This video series, titled ‘Lessons Learned’, will highlight things Christopher seas while he is on the water coaching and will give you some ideas to think about the next time you head out in your sea kayak. We hope that you will find them educational and that they help you get the most out of your days on the water.

Blade awareness will help take you’re paddling to the next level.

Understanding how your blade slices through the water will help give you more control in dynamic water. Have you ever found yourself “tripping” over your kayak paddle in challenging conditions? Well, taking some time to work on blade awareness will help you gain a better understanding and get the most out of your kayak paddle.

Key outcome:

  1. work on blade awareness in flat water
  2. Keep your wrist and forearm in line to minimize injury
  3. Allow time to develop this technique
  4. Get professional coaching to maximize your progression.

Lessons Learned

Lesson Learned- Hang onto your Kayak

This video series, titled ‘Lessons Learned’, will highlight things Christopher seas while he is on the water coaching and will give you some ideas to think about the next time you head out in your sea kayak. We hope that you will find them educational and that they help you get the most out of your days on the water.

‘Hang onto your Kayak’ is the first video in the Lessons Learned series. In this video, you will learn the importance of hanging onto your kayak with examples of what happens when you let go. One of the most important concepts after learning to wet exit your kayak is holding onto your kayak once you have a sense of humour failure and exit the kayak. It became obvious to me in 2018 that many people don’t put enough importance on this fundamental technique. Driving home the importance of this simple task needs to start at the foundation level and should carry on through the skills progression. When paddlers let go of their kayak in a dynamic environment this added a level of complexity that can be avoided. Whenever working in these environments we focus on simplifying the process and only take on more complexity if the environment demands it. During pool sessions and rescues, practice sessions in calm water reinforce the importance of staying in contact with the kayak at all times during any rescue or recovery of a swimmer. See you on the water!
Key takeaways from this video

  1. When practicing rescues in all environments maintain contact with your kayak.
  2. New paddler should be reminded of this important concept
  3. You need the kayak to put the swimmer back into. In a dynamic environment, things can become complex rather quickly.

Visit www.committed2thecore.com for more tips and professional coaching opportunities. Christopher Lockyer is a proud member of the P&H pro paddler Team Based in Nova Scotia. Sea you on the water

Lessons Learned – Rapid Acceleration

This video series, titled ‘Lessons Learned’, will highlight things Christopher seas while he is on the water coaching and will give you some ideas to think about the next time you head out in your sea kayak. We hope that you will find them educational and that they help you get the most out of your days on the water.

During the season we can build our confidence but we tend to keep missing waves and not being able to get onto the features we are trying to. This is where rapid acceleration comes into play. Get out there are use these tips to increase your enjoyment on the water. Professional coaching will help with your forward paddle stroke and the rest will come with time and hard work.

4 Key things to keep in mind when training and working n rapid acceleration

  1. Visualize where you need to take off from and how much distance you need to get your boat up to speed
  2. Increase your cadence 1,2,3,4,5
  3. Shorter up your paddle stroke
  4. Physical fitness and endurance are key to be able to reproduce this for a day on the water.

Visit www.committed2thecore.com for more tips and professional coaching opportunities. Christopher Lockyer is a proud member of the P&H pro paddler Team Based in Nova Scotia. Sea you on the water

Lessons Learned – Trim and posture

This video series, titled ‘Lessons Learned’, will highlight things Christopher seas while he is on the water coaching and will give you some ideas to think about the next time you head out in your sea kayak. We hope that you will find them educational and that they help you get the most out of your days on the water.

Posture and Trim – Lessons Learned

When it comes to posture and trim we all need to work on flexibility and also be aware that we are always moving in our kayak. Regardless of the environment, you are working in try and key your torso moving at all time. It will give you an increase in your range of motion but more impotently will increase blood flow to your entire body. Regularly moving your joints can help reduce pain, keep your joints flexible, and improve strength and overall balance.


Keys to Posture
• Try and sit up tall when performing forward paddling
• When in bumpy water try and change your posture to a slight forward lean
• Work on bracing and recovery stokes in your forward posture
• When working on rolling practice your forward finishing roll
• Posture is key to overall body health. Back fatigue can be a result of weakness in your core

Here is a link to 8 stretched that will help you touch your toes. These tips will help with posture and help you put your socks on as well.

Sea you on the water ~Christopher Lockyer

Lessons Learned – Lean Forward

This video series, titled ‘Lessons Learned’, will highlight things Christopher seas while he is on the water coaching and will give you some ideas to think about the next time you head out in your sea kayak. We hope that you will find them educational and that they help you get the most out of your days on the water.

So often we sea students putting themself in awkward body positions while on the water. So many tend to forget to lean forward which can increase opportunities to hurt yourself and also move you farther away from being able to reach your grab loop to get out of your kayak. When in the pool or practicing in flat water reinforce the home base potions tuck forward as if you are going to attempt a roll if for no other reason but to protect yourself and be close to your grab loop.

Hope this helps. Sea you on the water.

Visit www.committed2thecore.com for more tips and professional coaching opportunities. Christopher Lockyer is a proud member of the P&H pro paddler Team Based in Nova Scotia. Sea you on the water

Committed 2 the Roll

Often when learning 2 roll or working 2 better our roll, we find ourselves in moments of challenge or defeat.

We have compiled a list of 5 tools and Tactics that are intended to be agnostic of the style of sea kayak roll that you are working on.

6 Simple Tools and Tactics 2 sea kayak rolling

1 Mental Setup
2 Physical Setup
3 Slow things down
4 Stretching/Strength/Separation
5 Project Post Recovery
6 Introduce variation

Click on the image to download the PDF.

Cleopatras Needle Flooded Sea Kayak Rescue

This time we are showing you how we fix a worst-case scenario, as in “my kayak is sinking”! We are 4 kilometers offshore and we pulled of one of our hatches, leaving the front compartment exposed to the sea water. With a little leaning our kayak is flooding. It’s scary when doing this training exercise for the first time. We trained on this a lot in the safety of the harbor, and we advise you to get started in a safe environment when doing this training for the first time. You will be surprised how easy this rescue is. Of course, the harder the conditions, the harder it will get. But most important, we know that it is still possible to rescue ourselves when the worst thing happens. Follow up the top tips that we are giving in the video and you will do just fine. Make sure to carry a grab bag at all times, and make sure that you have duct tape with you. Trust us, this can happen (we have seen this happen only once, but still…) in real life.

The Deck Lines – Upgrading the Rescue Handles

Let us talk you through a small upgrade on the deck (or perimeter) lines of your sea kayak. In the video you will see Sylvie putting some flexible tube (from the DIY store) over the deck line near the cockpit. The benefit of this is very simple and convenient. It allows you to put good tension on the deck lines as it should be, and still be able to put your fingers (even when wearing gloves) underneath it at the right place. This is where the rescuer will grab, and stabilize, your boat when performing an assisted rescue during your re-entry. Also, another kayaker can grab them to stabilize you in rough water when you want to pick something out of your day hatch. It’s also easier for you to operate your short tow line with the carabiner hooks. It’s nothing revolutionary but it comes in very handy!! Feel free to share your own “sea kayak upgrades”, we’re always on the lookout for new ideas! Paddle safe and take care of each other on the water!

Cold Water Safety Test

After receiving a few questions from fellow paddlers about our survival time in cold water during a distress situation, we wanted to test things out. We often see other paddlers go on the water, poorly dressed and without even a clue that cold water can kill someone within minutes. In our team everybody is aware of that, and so the team members are dressed for immersion. We never had problems, or even cold, when doing exercises during the cold winter periods. During training we do a few rescues, get back in our crafts and paddle further on. That way, we keep up our body temperature. But, we wanted to know what to expect in an emergency situation when we are unable to get back in our craft, or worse, when losing our craft. We don’t want to know what happens when we are well rested, when our undergarment is perfectly dry (no sweat) and when we just begin our training. No, we want to know what will happen when we are tired (or exhausted), when our undergarment is wet from sweating, and when the water temperature is as low as possible in our area. So, we paddled a fast-paced tour (as fast as possible) to sweat a lot, lose energy and get tired. We succeeded in that when entering the safety of the harbor to commence the test. The water temperature is 2°C, which is the coldest the water gets in our area. Safety precautions were taken in advance and the Coast Guard was aware of our test. In the video you will see the stage we went through, from entering the water until we got ourselves in the first stage of hypothermia. After thirty minutes we experienced uncontrolled shivering which was the signal to get out of the water. Of course, it would be possible a lot longer in cold water, in case of a real emergency. But we don’t want to take risks, our goal was already achieved. We were able to conduct a cold-water safety test that was as realistic as possible. That way we can share our knowledge with the rest of the team, and with other paddlers. Our main message; don’t be afraid of going out when it’s (very) cold, but be well prepared. Wear a good quality PFD and good clothing that protects you against the cold water (dress for immersion), field and swim test your gear on a regular base in the conditions you paddle in and last but not least, imagine the worst that can happen and prepare for it! We sincerely hope that our test can help you get a better understanding of cold water safety. We also advise you to have a look at the website of the NATIONAL CENTER FOR COLD WATER SAFETY. You can find a lot of good tips, together with real life stories. Paddle safe and take care of each other!!

 

 

 

The Self-Rescue Training Drill

Training is about the repetition of techniques and skills. Training should enable you to do things automatically, without thinking about it, without hesitations.  We have the good habit in our team to do some of those so-called training drills every time we go out for a paddle.  There’s absolutely no excuse for not doing it, it only costs you a few minutes at the beginning, at the end or somewhere in between your paddling session, your choice.  This drill on the self-rescue is about gaining extra stability when you are on the back deck.  It makes you aware of your sea kayaks behavior when you’re out of the cock-pit.  It gives you the needed confidence should you capsize.  Start with it on calm water and then build your way up so you can do this drill in the conditions you normally paddle in. We give you a few extra tips in the video.  Enjoy your training!  Paddle safe and take care of each other on the water!

 

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